Health minister Lord Darzi has announced five “pledges to the public and staff” that will guide changes to NHS services in a new report.

Lord Darzi's report Leading Local Change was published last Friday (9th May), anticipating his long-awaited final report on the next stage of NHS reform due out in June. He said that the five principles “will ensure that change is transparent and driven by the best evidence”, and the accompanying press release notes that PCTs (the local NHS organisational units) “will have a duty” to heed these new pledges.

Darzi’s five rules on NHS change are:
1. Change will always be to the benefit of patients, to improve the quality of care that patients receive.
2. Change will be clinically driven, to the benefit of patients by making sure that it is always led by clinicians and based on the best available clinical evidence.
3. All change will be locally-led - the NHS must meet the different needs of everyone. Different places have different and changing needs, best met by local solutions.
4. Patients, carers, the public and other key partners will be involved. NHS organisations will work openly and collaboratively.
5. Patients, carers, the public and other key partners will see the difference first. Existing services will not be withdrawn until new and better services are available to patients so they can see the difference.

Lord Darzi said, "this is not about change for change's sake. It's about change for the right reasons, improving quality of care for patients and saving lives. These pledges mean change will be locally-led, clinically-driven and evidence-based. And an independent high clinical bar for change should reassure local people everywhere that we mean what we say."

Regional group meetings were announced to take the changes forward.

Broad welcome
Reactions to the announcement were broadly positive. Calling it “a breath of fresh air”, Dr Michael Dixon GP, chair of the NHS Alliance said, “we applaud Lord Darzi’s five principles. But now we need to see clear evidence that the NHS supports him and that there is a real change in the way the health service operates. Frontline clinicians and managers should be the power source of change instead of merely being ‘engaged’ and ‘consulted’ about change directed from the top.”

And the British Medical Association, which has been publicly highly critical of Darzi’s proposal for polyclinics, offered some support. Dr Hamish Meldrum, BMA Chairman, said,

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Health minister Lord Darzi has announced five “pledges to the public and staff” that will guide changes to NHS services in a new report.

Lord Darzi's report Leading Local Change was published last Friday (9th May), anticipating his long-awaited final report on the next stage of NHS reform due out in June. He said that the five principles “will ensure that change is transparent and driven by the best evidence”, and the accompanying press release notes that PCTs (the local NHS organisational units) “will have a duty” to heed these new pledges.

Darzi’s five rules on NHS change are:
1. Change will always be to the benefit of patients, to improve the quality of care that patients receive.
2. Change will be clinically driven, to the benefit of patients by making sure that it is always led by clinicians and based on the best available clinical evidence.
3. All change will be locally-led - the NHS must meet the different needs of everyone. Different places have different and changing needs, best met by local solutions.
4. Patients, carers, the public and other key partners will be involved. NHS organisations will work openly and collaboratively.
5. Patients, carers, the public and other key partners will see the difference first. Existing services will not be withdrawn until new and better services are available to patients so they can see the difference.

Lord Darzi said, "this is not about change for change's sake. It's about change for the right reasons, improving quality of care for patients and saving lives. These pledges mean change will be locally-led, clinically-driven and evidence-based. And an independent high clinical bar for change should reassure local people everywhere that we mean what we say."

Regional group meetings were announced to take the changes forward.

Broad welcome
Reactions to the announcement were broadly positive. Calling it “a breath of fresh air”, Dr Michael Dixon GP, chair of the NHS Alliance said, “we applaud Lord Darzi’s five principles. But now we need to see clear evidence that the NHS supports him and that there is a real change in the way the health service operates. Frontline clinicians and managers should be the power source of change instead of merely being ‘engaged’ and ‘consulted’ about change directed from the top.”

And the British Medical Association, which has been publicly highly critical of Darzi’s proposal for polyclinics, offered some support. Dr Hamish Meldrum, BMA Chairman, sa

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Health minister Lord Darzi has announced five “pledges to the public and staff” that will guide changes to NHS services in a new report.

Lord Darzi's report Leading Local Change was published last Friday (9th May), anticipating his long-awaited final report on the next stage of NHS reform due out in June. He said that the five principles “will ensure that change is transparent and driven by the best evidence”, and the accompanying press release notes that PCTs (the local NHS organisational units) “will have a duty” to heed these new pledges.

Darzi’s five rules on NHS change are:
1. Change will always be to the benefit of patients, to improve the quality of care that patients receive.
2. Change will be clinically driven, to the benefit of patients by making sure that it is always led by clinicians and based on the best available clinical evidence.
3. All change will be locally-led - the NHS must meet the different needs of everyone. Different places have different and changing needs, best met by local solutions.
4. Patients, carers, the public and other key partners will be involved. NHS organisations will work openly and collaboratively.
5. Patients, carers, the public and other key partners will see the difference first. Existing services will not be withdrawn until new and better services are available to patients so they can see the difference.

Lord Darzi said, "this is not about change for change's sake. It's about change for the right reasons, improving quality of care for patients and saving lives. These pledges mean change will be locally-led, clinically-driven and evidence-based. And an independent high clinical bar for change should reassure local people everywhere that we mean what we say."

Regional group meetings were announced to take the changes forward.

Broad welcome
Reactions to the announcement were broadly positive. Calling it “a breath of fresh air”, Dr Michael Dixon GP, chair of the NHS Alliance said, “we applaud Lord Darzi’s five principles. But now we need to see clear evidence that the NHS supports him and that there is a real change in the way the health service operates. Frontline clinicians and managers should be the power source of change instead of merely being ‘engaged’ and ‘consulted’ about change directed from the top.”

And the British Medical Association, which has been publicly highly critical of Darzi’s proposal for polyclinics, offered some support. Dr Hamish Meldrum, BMA Chairman, sa