The Chief Medical Officer has announced the launch of annual appraisals for doctors practicing in the UK. Professor Sir Liam Donaldson”s new report Medical Revalidation: Principle and Next Steps also announces that every five years, all doctors and hospital consultants (as well as those who practice privately) will have a revalidation of their licence.

The ultimate sanction of the reviews will be the removal of the licence to practice from consistently poor performers. The annual appraisals will consider doctor’s prescribing habits, and examine the adequacy of their assessment of patients’ conditions. It will also consider whether doctors’ personal circumstances (such as drug or alcohol habits) impact on their practice.

Patients’ feedback on their doctors will also be collected and considered as part of the reviews. They will be asked for views on their doctor, including effective communication (including listening, informing and explaining); involving patients in treatment decisions; care co-ordination and support for self-care; and showing respect for patients and treating them with dignity.

Professor Donaldson told the launch, “I'm confident that this process, agreed with doctors' representatives will help raise standards of medical practice and improve the quality of the patient experience. The involvement of patients and public in the process will help define what counts as good healthcare and in the rare cases where doctors are falling short, provide them, where possible, with the support needed to renew their registration”.

Revalidation and recertification will be introduced in stages from spring 2009, following a series of pilots scheduled to begin at the start of the year. These arrangements will be supported by the introduction of Responsible Officers (senior doctors in each healthcare organisation who will take responsibility for collating the information needed to support a recommendation on revalidation).

Reactions to revalidation
BMA Chairman Dr Hamish Meldrum, said,

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The Chief Medical Officer has announced the launch of annual appraisals for doctors practicing in the UK. Professor Sir Liam Donaldson”s new report Medical Revalidation: Principle and Next Steps also announces that every five years, all doctors and hospital consultants (as well as those who practice privately) will have a revalidation of their licence.

The ultimate sanction of the reviews will be the removal of the licence to practice from consistently poor performers. The annual appraisals will consider doctor’s prescribing habits, and examine the adequacy of their assessment of patients’ conditions. It will also consider whether doctors’ personal circumstances (such as drug or alcohol habits) impact on their practice.

Patients’ feedback on their doctors will also be collected and considered as part of the reviews. They will be asked for views on their doctor, including effective communication (including listening, informing and explaining); involving patients in treatment decisions; care co-ordination and support for self-care; and showing respect for patients and treating them with dignity.

Professor Donaldson told the launch, “I'm confident that this process, agreed with doctors' representatives will help raise standards of medical practice and improve the quality of the patient experience. The involvement of patients and public in the process will help define what counts as good healthcare and in the rare cases where doctors are falling short, provide them, where possible, with the support needed to renew their registration”.

Revalidation and recertification will be introduced in stages from spring 2009, following a series of pilots scheduled to begin at the start of the year. These arrangements will be supported by the introduction of Responsible Officers (senior doctors in each healthcare organisation who will take responsibility for collating the information needed to support a recommendation on revalidation).

Reactions to revalidation
BMA Chairman Dr Hamish Meldrum, sa

_

The Chief Medical Officer has announced the launch of annual appraisals for doctors practicing in the UK. Professor Sir Liam Donaldson”s new report Medical Revalidation: Principle and Next Steps also announces that every five years, all doctors and hospital consultants (as well as those who practice privately) will have a revalidation of their licence.

The ultimate sanction of the reviews will be the removal of the licence to practice from consistently poor performers. The annual appraisals will consider doctor’s prescribing habits, and examine the adequacy of their assessment of patients’ conditions. It will also consider whether doctors’ personal circumstances (such as drug or alcohol habits) impact on their practice.

Patients’ feedback on their doctors will also be collected and considered as part of the reviews. They will be asked for views on their doctor, including effective communication (including listening, informing and explaining); involving patients in treatment decisions; care co-ordination and support for self-care; and showing respect for patients and treating them with dignity.

Professor Donaldson told the launch, “I'm confident that this process, agreed with doctors' representatives will help raise standards of medical practice and improve the quality of the patient experience. The involvement of patients and public in the process will help define what counts as good healthcare and in the rare cases where doctors are falling short, provide them, where possible, with the support needed to renew their registration”.

Revalidation and recertification will be introduced in stages from spring 2009, following a series of pilots scheduled to begin at the start of the year. These arrangements will be supported by the introduction of Responsible Officers (senior doctors in each healthcare organisation who will take responsibility for collating the information needed to support a recommendation on revalidation).

Reactions to revalidation
BMA Chairman Dr Hamish Meldrum, sa

_

The Chief Medical Officer has announced the launch of annual appraisals for doctors practicing in the UK. Professor Sir Liam Donaldson”s new report Medical Revalidation: Principle and Next Steps also announces that every five years, all doctors and hospital consultants (as well as those who practice privately) will have a revalidation of their licence.

The ultimate sanction of the reviews will be the removal of the licence to practice from consistently poor performers. The annual appraisals will consider doctor’s prescribing habits, and examine the adequacy of their assessment of patients’ conditions. It will also consider whether doctors’ personal circumstances (such as drug or alcohol habits) impact on their practice.

Patients’ feedback on their doctors will also be collected and considered as part of the reviews. They will be asked for views on their doctor, including effective communication (including listening, informing and explaining); involving patients in treatment decisions; care co-ordination and support for self-care; and showing respect for patients and treating them with dignity.

Professor Donaldson told the launch, “I'm confident that this process, agreed with doctors' representatives will help raise standards of medical practice and improve the quality of the patient experience. The involvement of patients and public in the process will help define what counts as good healthcare and in the rare cases where doctors are falling short, provide them, where possible, with the support needed to renew their registration”.

Revalidation and recertification will be introduced in stages from spring 2009, following a series of pilots scheduled to begin at the start of the year. These arrangements will be supported by the introduction of Responsible Officers (senior doctors in each healthcare organisation who will take responsibility for collating the information needed to support a recommendation on revalidation).

Reactions to revalidation
BMA Chairman Dr Hamish Meldrum, sa