A new report from the National Audit Office points out that the programme remains behind schedule in key areas. The National Programme for IT in the NHS: Progress since 2006 points out that delivering the programme is proving to be an enormous challenge. While it notes that “all elements of the Programme are advancing and some are complete,” the NAO report adds that the original timescales for the electronic Care Records Service (a central element) “turned out to be unachievable, raised unrealistic expectations and put confidence in the Programme at risk”.

The NAO report concludes that the original vision “remains intact and still appears feasible. However, it is likely to take until 2014-15 before every NHS trust in England has fully deployed the care records systems, four years later than planned”.

It notes that in the North, Midlands and East areas, the software development has taken much longer than planned, forcing some trusts to take an interim system. Completing the development of the system and introducing it in this area are significant challenges that remain to be addressed.

The Programme’s estimated £12.7 billion costs (for the main contracts) have remained broadly unchanged, aside from the purchase of increased functionality. Because of the delay in deployments, actual expenditure to date (£3.6 billion by 31 March 2008) has been much lower than expected.

Tim Burr, head of the National Audit Office, said:

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A new report from the National Audit Office points out that the programme remains behind schedule in key areas. The National Programme for IT in the NHS: Progress since 2006 points out that delivering the programme is proving to be an enormous challenge. While it notes that “all elements of the Programme are advancing and some are complete,” the NAO report adds that the original timescales for the electronic Care Records Service (a central element) “turned out to be unachievable, raised unrealistic expectations and put confidence in the Programme at risk”.

The NAO report concludes that the original vision “remains intact and still appears feasible. However, it is likely to take until 2014-15 before every NHS trust in England has fully deployed the care records systems, four years later than planned”.

It notes that in the North, Midlands and East areas, the software development has taken much longer than planned, forcing some trusts to take an interim system. Completing the development of the system and introducing it in this area are significant challenges that remain to be addressed.

The Programme’s estimated £12.7 billion costs (for the main contracts) have remained broadly unchanged, aside from the purchase of increased functionality. Because of the delay in deployments, actual expenditure to date (£3.6 billion by 31 March 2008) has been much lower than expected.

Tim Burr, head of the National Audit Office, sa

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A new report from the National Audit Office points out that the programme remains behind schedule in key areas. The National Programme for IT in the NHS: Progress since 2006 points out that delivering the programme is proving to be an enormous challenge. While it notes that “all elements of the Programme are advancing and some are complete,” the NAO report adds that the original timescales for the electronic Care Records Service (a central element) “turned out to be unachievable, raised unrealistic expectations and put confidence in the Programme at risk”.

The NAO report concludes that the original vision “remains intact and still appears feasible. However, it is likely to take until 2014-15 before every NHS trust in England has fully deployed the care records systems, four years later than planned”.

It notes that in the North, Midlands and East areas, the software development has taken much longer than planned, forcing some trusts to take an interim system. Completing the development of the system and introducing it in this area are significant challenges that remain to be addressed.

The Programme’s estimated £12.7 billion costs (for the main contracts) have remained broadly unchanged, aside from the purchase of increased functionality. Because of the delay in deployments, actual expenditure to date (£3.6 billion by 31 March 2008) has been much lower than expected.

Tim Burr, head of the National Audit Office, sa

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A new report from the National Audit Office points out that the programme remains behind schedule in key areas. The National Programme for IT in the NHS: Progress since 2006 points out that delivering the programme is proving to be an enormous challenge. While it notes that “all elements of the Programme are advancing and some are complete,” the NAO report adds that the original timescales for the electronic Care Records Service (a central element) “turned out to be unachievable, raised unrealistic expectations and put confidence in the Programme at risk”.

The NAO report concludes that the original vision “remains intact and still appears feasible. However, it is likely to take until 2014-15 before every NHS trust in England has fully deployed the care records systems, four years later than planned”.

It notes that in the North, Midlands and East areas, the software development has taken much longer than planned, forcing some trusts to take an interim system. Completing the development of the system and introducing it in this area are significant challenges that remain to be addressed.

The Programme’s estimated £12.7 billion costs (for the main contracts) have remained broadly unchanged, aside from the purchase of increased functionality. Because of the delay in deployments, actual expenditure to date (£3.6 billion by 31 March 2008) has been much lower than expected.

Tim Burr, head of the National Audit Office, sa

_

A new report from the National Audit Office points out that the programme remains behind schedule in key areas. The National Programme for IT in the NHS: Progress since 2006 points out that delivering the programme is proving to be an enormous challenge. While it notes that “all elements of the Programme are advancing and some are complete,” the NAO report adds that the original timescales for the electronic Care Records Service (a central element) “turned out to be unachievable, raised unrealistic expectations and put confidence in the Programme at risk”.

The NAO report concludes that the original vision “remains intact and still appears feasible. However, it is likely to take until 2014-15 before every NHS trust in England has fully deployed the care records systems, four years later than planned”.

It notes that in the North, Midlands and East areas, the software development has taken much longer than planned, forcing some trusts to take an interim system. Completing the development of the system and introducing it in this area are significant challenges that remain to be addressed.

The Programme’s estimated £12.7 billion costs (for the main contracts) have remained broadly unchanged, aside from the purchase of increased functionality. Because of the delay in deployments, actual expenditure to date (£3.6 billion by 31 March 2008) has been much lower than expected.

Tim Burr, head of the National Audit Office, sa